News

Featured posts:

Indian Country Today coverage of #SovSummer #IdleNoMore!

Screen_Shot_2013-06-28_at_12.00.18_AM.pngIndian Country Today coverage of #SovSummer #IdleNoMore! "In the meantime, the Idle No More movement that began late last year has bloomed this spring with new force, an Indigenous Spring, so to speak, that is spreading from eastern Canada’s Burnt Church to northern Saskatchewan. Native people are declaring that consent cannot be manufactured by federal threats."

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2013/06/26/idle-no-more-canada-escalates-war-first-nations-150125

Add your reaction Share

Activist Communique: Idle No More's Sovereignty Summer is heating up

More than 2,000 people gathered at Parliament Hill on Friday June 21, 2013, to kick off Sovereignty Summer -- a joint campaign between Idle No More and Defenders of the land.

The CBC is reporting that it "has learned that Shawn Atleo, national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, met with Harper in the prime minister's office in Langevin Block on Thursday to discuss progress since a Jan. 11 meeting that followed growing nation-wide protests and a fast by Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence."

No outcome of the meeting was publicly announced.

The mood at Parliament Hill was of defiance and of happiness as friends came together to sing and drum. Eager to disprove rumours that Idle No More is dead, many professed that they're willing to step up when the time comes to hit the streets again or support blockades -- like the current Swamp Line 9 anti-tar sands blockade in Hamilton, Ontario.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Sovereignty Summer Campaign Calling for National Solidarity Actions and Support for Elsipogtog First Nation Front Line Activists

June 24, 2013 - Elsipogtog First Nation - This is an official notice and “Call Out” to all Idle No More & Defenders of the Land – Sovereignty Summer - activists, allies and supporters, and partnership organizations to act in aid and in the defence of grassroots Elsipogtog First Nation, families, community members, and supporters near Moncton, New Brunswick.


In the last few weeks, Elsipogtog First Nation community members and allies have taken peaceful action to prevent seismic testing vehicles and workers from testing for shale gas deposits for purposes of resource exploitation on Indigenous territories.

The protestors have remained strong and peaceful for numerous days and the RCMP have become more aggressive and violent; arresting a man as he held a sacred pipe in his hand, as well as arresting community members at the site of the sacred fire. SWN contractors have also threatened to run over Mi'kmaq youth at the site.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Aboriginal Day marchers look ahead to 'Sovereignty Summer'

From The Canadian Press published on cbc.ca

As First Nations groups marched on Parliament Hill to mark National Aboriginal Day, NDP Leader Tom Mulcair forecast a "hot summer" as tensions in the country's indigenous communities threaten to boil over.

"I can tell from having talked to hundreds of representatives of First Nations that that frustration is palpable, it's growing, especially amongst the young people," Mulcair said Friday.

"We're going to see a lot of activity on this file during the summer. ... I'm quite concerned that it will be a hot summer on the native file across Canada, on the aboriginal file. Mr. Harper's going to have only himself to blame."

Read more
Add your reaction Share

National chief Shawn Atleo joins activists in call to action

GLORIA GALLOWAY  OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail

The leader of this country’s largest indigenous group says Friday’s National Aboriginal Day is an opportunity to reconcile the difficult history that native people share with other Canadians.

But as First Nations grow increasingly frustrated with a federal government they say is oblivious to their concerns, Shawn Atleo is talking less about conciliation and more about things that will be done to drive home the urgency of the situation.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Aboriginal activists to ‘increase tension’ over rights during summer of action

From , canada.com:

OTTAWA — Indigenous rights activists are aiming to “increase tension” this summer to oppose the Harper government’s agenda, which they say ignores aboriginal rights and weakens environmental protections.

Friday, National Aboriginal Day, marks the launch of the so-called “Sovereignty Summer” in which the grassroots indigenous Idle No More movement says it will band together with other activist groups to plan “non-violent direct action” across the country.

“The point is to increase tension,” said Sheelah McLean, one of Idle No More’s four co-founders. “To raise awareness and increase tension between people who are wanting to assert their rights and people who are unjustly forgetting about the rights of indigenous peoples.”

At play are many of the same issues that helped galvanize the indigenous movement in December and January when protests reached their peak: matters such as implementing historic treaty rights, the federal government’s changes to environmental protections, and consultation with aboriginals regarding resource development on their traditional lands.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

National Aboriginal Day: First Nations Groups March On Parliament Hill

CP  |  By Steve Rennie, The Canadian Press

OTTAWA - As First Nations groups marched on Parliament Hill to mark National Aboriginal Day, NDP Leader Tom Mulcair forecast a "hot summer" as tensions in the country's indigenous communities threaten to boil over.

"I can tell from having talked to hundreds of representatives of First Nations that that frustration is palpable, it's growing, especially amongst the young people," Mulcair said Friday.

"We're going to see a lot of activity on this file during the summer. ... I'm quite concerned that it will be a hot summer on the native file across Canada, on the aboriginal file. Mr. Harper's going to have only himself to blame."

About 150 people started their walk at Victoria Island in the Ottawa River — where Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence staged her liquid-only protest earlier this year — and made their way to the Parliament Buildings.

They whistled, beat drums, sang and waved an array of flags as they brought lunchtime traffic to a halt on the bridge connecting Ottawa and Gatineau, Que. Some carried signs that read "A sacred journey for future generations" and "A walk for unity."

Activists say the march marks the beginning of a "Sovereignty Summer, which is an offshoot of the Idle No More movement that encompasses other aboriginal groups.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Sovereignty Summer to ‘increase tension’ over rights during summer of action

idle_no_more_kitimat_20121230_25399711.jpgBy Michael Woods, Postmedia News

OTTAWA —Indigenous rights activists are aiming to “increase tension” this summer to oppose the Harper government’s agenda, which they say ignores aboriginal rights and weakens environmental protections.

Friday, National Aboriginal Day, marks the launch of the so-called “Sovereignty Summer” in which the grassroots indigenous Idle No More movement says it will band together with other activist groups to plan “non-violent direct action” across the country.

“The point is to increase tension,” said Sheelah McLean, one of Idle No More’s four co-founders. “To raise awareness and increase tension between people who are wanting to assert their rights and people who are unjustly forgetting about the rights of indigenous peoples.”

Read more
Add your reaction Share

First Nations groups mobilizing for “Sovereignty Summer”

By

As spring draws to a close, aboriginal groups are gearing up for a very busy few months in what’s been dubbed “Sovereignty Summer” by organizers and activists.

And they’re hoping to cause a hassle for the Conservative government.

Organizers from Idle No More and Defenders of the Land, a network of indigenous communities aiming to protect environmental and aboriginal rights, have banded together for the joint Sovereignty Summer campaign.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

First Nations Leader Calls on Politicians to Experience Tar Sands Firsthand at 2013 Healing Walk

Minister Joe Oliver and Premier Redford Invited to Join More than 500 Residents and Concerned Citizens From Across Canada, US

FORT MCMURRAY, ALBERTA--(Marketwired - June 17, 2013) -

Editors Note: A photo for this release will be available on the Canadian Press picture wire via Marketwire.

Chief Allan Adam of the Athabasca Fort Chipewyan First Nation has issued a formal request to Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver and Alberta Premier Allison Redford to join the fourth annual Tar Sands Healing Walk in Fort McMurray on July 6. A fourteen-kilometre, day-long journey, hosted by the Keepers of the Athabasca, the Healing Walk is a spiritual gathering focused on healing the traditional territory of the nations that has been impacted by tar sands expansion.

"We believe that our politicians are out of touch and have no idea what it is like to live day-to-day in a place that has been made toxic by out of control tar sands development. It is important for them to experience this place, to drink the water, breathe the air and hear from the people who are quickly losing hope for a livable future for their children and grandchildren," said Chief Adam. "On behalf of our nation and the more than five hundred others who will join us on this journey, we invite Minister Oliver and Premier Redford to walk alongside us."

To encourage participation by the politicians, the nation has also issued a formal petition, which to date has already gathered close to 7000 signatures. The petition can be found on the Healing Walk website at http://www.healingwalk.org/helpfromhome

Read more
Add your reaction Share