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Harper v. First Nations: The assimilation agenda

Government response to Supreme Court case on Aboriginal title proposes capitulation, not reconciliation, for First Nations

Last week, in response to this summer’s Supreme Court decision in Tsilhqot’in Nation v. British Columbia, the Harper government quietly put forward an aggressive revision of Canada’s Indian policy. It is the first major revision of Canada’s comprehensive land claims and Aboriginal self-government policies since 1986.

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The indigenous land rights ruling that could transform Canada

by Martin Lukacs - The Guardian (photo credit Friends of the Nemaiah Valley)

Indigenous rights offer a path to a radically more just and sustainable country – which is why the Canadian government is bent on eliminating them.

The unrest is palpable. In First Nations across Canada, word is spreading of a historic court ruling recognizing Indigenous land rights. And the murmurs are turning to action: an eviction notice issued to a railway company in British Columbia; a park occupied in Vancouver; lawsuits launched against the Enbridge tar sands pipeline; a government deal reconsidered by Ontario Algonquins; and sovereignty declared by the Atikamekw in Quebec.

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Frack Off Media Kit

Download the #Frack Off Media Kit

INM_Media_Kit_Sept_2014v1sm_FINAL.jpg

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Idle No More Honours Loretta Saunders & All Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women & Girls

“If we could change ourselves, the tendencies in the world would also change. As a man changes his own nature, so does the attitude of the world change towards him. … We need not wait to see what others do.” ~ Gandhi

From all 4 corners of the Earth, let us pray.  

Pray for justice, pray for peace, pray for nations, states, communities,  a World that cherishes its’ Children, Loves and Honours its Women, and for Men to rise up in Love; to Honour themselves and the Women and Children.

Yes, there are many groups asking the Prime Minister of Canada, Stephen Harper, to do a public inquiry into Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women and Girls; which is required and needed on a global level also. However,  for personal/collective responsibility on change, don’t wait on this one man, who has failed and abused his role as a leader so miserably, already. Let us work to support, strengthen, and empower each other to create a world we want all to be safe, free, and cherishes the gift of life.

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In Canada every system of oppression is organized around settler colonialism

By Candida Hadley - Halifax Media Co-op (Photo PolicyAlternatives.ca)

An Interview with Harsha Walia

K'JIPUKTUK (Halifax) -  Harsha Walia is an activist, writer and founder of the Vancouver chapter of No One is Illegal. She has organized in migrant justice, Indigenous solidarity, Palestinian liberation, antiracist, feminist, anti-imperialist, and anti-capitalist movements and communities for over a decade. Naomi Klein called her “one of Canada’s most brilliant and effective political organizers.”

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Decolonize The Food and Drug Administration and Evict Monsanto World Wide

Poster and article submitted by Quanah Parker Brightman and UNA

The American Indian Contribution To The World's Food

Did you know that over 62% of all the food that the entire world eats today was originally developed by American Indian people ? It’s true ! In fact, if you took out all the food in your cupboards and refrigerator that was developed by Indians, you wouldn’t be left with much to eat. Have you ever gone to a movie and had a tub of popcorn ? Well, if it weren’t for the ingenuity of ancient Indian folks, you’d have to eat something else at the movie ! Yes, that’s right, Indians invented popcorn ... and many other foods and drinks you enjoy today. The list below will clearly convey the overwhelming Indian contribution to the food of today’s world.

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The Termination Plan for Indigenous Peoples'

Please download and use the slides below for your Teach-In or organizing work.  You can use a projector and share the slides as a power point presentation or you can print-off and hand out the slides.  Slides are available as in both power point and PDF files.

 

PDF Version:

Indigenous_Termination_Plan_Slides.jpg

Power Point Version:

 Indigenous_Termination_Plan_Slides.jpg

 

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Organizing a Teach-In in your Community

We recognize that this has been a very powerful and intense year that has involved a lot of hard work from Indigenous peoples and allies from across the globe. The purpose of the Teach- in resource materials are to provide a framework that you can potentially use for your Teach -in on January 28th. We recognize that people are tired and still working tirelessly. At these times it’s important to lend out a hand of support to each other as we sit together and learn better ways to move forward.

Most of the Teach-ins have been organized as groups. If you do not know of other people involved with Idle No More in your area you can also contact Idle No More / Defenders of the Land organizers through the website (http://www.idlenomore.ca/contact). We can help you get in touch with other people in your area involved in the movement.

Possible Agenda / Template:

1. Begin with Ceremony or with something appropriate for your group or community


Rationale:   We are at a time in history where our very existence is being continually threatened. The guidance of our Ancestors and the Spirits will help nurture our efforts so that we are able to move forward in a strong, cohesive, and grounded way.  These teachings are found in ceremonies that permeated our governance structures,  our relationships with others, our roles and responsibilities, and our responsibilities to protect the Earth. When our work is grounded in our ceremonies we are able to go beyond shallow intellectual responses towards coming up with solutions which truly provide spiritual connections to the Earth.   While ceremony can have a wide range of definitions, it is important that whatever your group decides, that people are welcomed and not excluded.

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What revolution looks like to me, sovereignty summer schools?

by âpihtawikosisân (Image credit, Strong Families)

It is so easy to get bogged down by all the problems indigenous peoples face. Poverty, suicide, addiction, disease, incarceration, homelessness, violence — where does one even begin to address these things?

We can cast our nets widely, and see the big picture in all its ugly colonial horror. This is absolutely necessary; but philosophically deconstructing colonialism can only get us so far when so many indigenous peoples are struggling just to have their basic needs met.

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Sovereignty: Do First Nations Need It?

An Informative Essay by, Mohawk Lawyer and Legal Academic :

Stephen John Ford

The problem with answering this question is ground in the misunderstanding Indigenous People have about what Sovereignty really is. Some Indigenous people take the position that Sovereignty is a concept particular to the Colonizer. Others point out that word doesn't exist in their language and therefore has never been known to their Nation. Indeed, the concept of Sovereignty was developed in Europe in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. Linguistically, it is rooted in the Old French: soverei'nete . Although there may be no single word in an Indigenous language that compares identically to sovereignty, the concept as it would apply in a First Nation context, is clearly present.

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